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Pirated Music -Yes or No?


Rocky4

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I buy CDs

 

+1

 

MP3s, even at the typical 256Kbps which is what I rip my CDs to for my media player, is still pretty crummy sounding compared to the original. Until I can buy downloads that sound the same as a CD and buy a media player with a larger drive, I'll keep ripping them myself for on-the-go music.

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How do you acquire your music? Limewire or torrents. Do you buy CDs or download from iTunes?

 

CD or Download from iTunes

 

What's your opinion of piracy?

 

It's illegal. You might as well rob a musician if you're going to pirate music, it's the same thing. Would you want someone stealing from you?

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I'm a downloader. Most of the artists I listen to make their money from touring. My music process usually goes as follows:

Hear a song or cd via a friend, burn or download that cd, go see the band live and buy cd's at the show. That way I can get the liner sleeve signed if I get backstage. If it's a band that's self produced, I usually tend to skip the burning/downloading preview since I stumble across them at local venues or festivals. Either way, if a band is good I support them. In my younger days, I'd spend most of my paychecks on cd's, and usually it was hit or miss. The way I see it, record companies should be ashamed to have the catchiest song overplayed on the radio. People either buy the cd and listen to the same hit single over and over until they're sick of it, or they're ultimately disappointed in the amount of filler that's packed in around a few really good songs. On a rare occasion, you'll get an album and find out that the song that's being sold as a single isn't neccessarily the best song on the album, or even in the top five. Those bands are the ones I get turned onto and tend to buy everything in their catalog.

 

When it comes down to the financial end of things, bands make more if you go see them live. Then your money is being distributed mainly to the venue and the band. If you buy from a store or itunes, the money is distributed among more people, and the band makes less. That's why I feel no shame in downloading. I'd gladly pay more at the show for the same thing, knowing that more money is going to the band.

 

I also think that if record companies can press charges against people who download, then I should be able to press charges for misrepresenting a product when their records sound nothing like the singles that they use to promote them. Where's their buy back policy for music that sucks?

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One thing I love about Limewire (Bear share' date=' Kazza, all the other P2P Programs) is that people that put this crap on their machines never understand the damage they cause their computers. I do not work on home pc's unless its a business client. All the crap on these machine from the P2P network and the EULA allows those networks to put anything on your pc they want. It takes 15 minutes to boot and the CPU is at 100% the entire time and there are 100's of malware programs and viruses...[/quote']

 

I always recommend Packeteer Packetshapers (now Bluecoat) to my customers, to block that P2P crap and a lot of other crap on thier networks. Kazaa can be a network killer.

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i do my fair share of it all

 

buying cd's

 

buying records

 

downloading for free

 

burning friend's cd

 

its important to support bands, i do, i support the HELL out of local music, and many other bands i go see LIVE

 

but think of it this way, hendrix's active period was what? 4 years

 

he was a hardcore partying *** motherf'ucker, drowned in his own puke

 

i think i heard his music is "owned" by a rich brother or relative,

 

and i get some of his music for free, i really doubt he'd give a rats ***

 

c'mon guys, music isnt about money, spreading your sound isnt about money, its about exposing people to your art your style your ideas

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i do my fair share of it all

 

buying cd's

 

buying records

 

downloading for free

 

burning friend's cd

 

its important to support bands' date=' i do, i support the HELL out of local music, and many other bands i go see LIVE

 

but think of it this way, hendrix's active period was what? 4 years

 

he was a hardcore partying *** motherf'ucker, drowned in his own puke

 

i think i heard his music is "owned" by a rich brother or relative,

 

and i get some of his music for free, i really doubt he'd give a rats ***

 

c'mon guys, music isnt about money, spreading your sound isnt about money, its about exposing people to your art your style your ideas[/quote']

Finally, somebody who lives in the real world

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CD's that go through distribution agents will get an artist about $3. Split it with a 4 piece band, that's $0.75. CD's sold at a concert merch booth will get the artist $10 - $15. Split it amongst a 4 piece band, it's $2.50 - $3.75 per person. All the other merchandise makes them money too, and isn't available in record stores. Then there's the take that they get from the venue. So for an up and coming popular band, maybe 10k for a bigger club. When I was working for a local agency that set up shows, most were 10k to 20k a night - for bands that would draw enough people to justify the cost. So figure 10k. That's 3,333 records they'd have to sell through a distro agent that wasn't screwing them over (good luck finding one of those) or one night on a tour. To assume that bands make their money touring isn't really an assumption at all. The point of making a record is to draw people in for your tour. That's why so many artists support tape trading at their shows. It gets their sound out and builds a fan base and gets more people coming out to see them.

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Generally, if I download something (and it's not something I've done recently), it would be a song that I can no longer find in the stores. Maybe some obscure song that I remember from my adolescence, ya know? I don't consider it stealing, either, cause it's not something I could walk into a store and buy, much less shoplift.

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I buy most of my stuff from iTunes, then remove the protection because I hate iTunes. I have no problem paying .99 cents for a song. Years ago (before mp3's), I remember BS'ing with my coworkers about how cool it would be if you could pick and choose what songs you wanted from an album. Now that we finally can, I'm not going to *****.. and .99 cents ain't all that bad.

 

That being said, sometimes I'll just "steal" obscure songs that I've had before on tape or record and have since lost. I figure I've already paid for the right to listen to that song, so there's no since in doing it again. It's really not all that much different than making your buddy a mix tape 20 years ago.

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In an attempt to clear my name, I know that downloading is a sketchy thing to do. However, I buy 90% of the albums after I download them. If there's a website where I can listen to the entire album before I buy it, I'll skip the downloading step altogether.

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i buy vinyl which supports a friendly local buisness (whom ive bought records from for years), vinyl doesnt support bands, most records are unchecked floating around from owner to owner

 

and the bands i give money dont get given money unless its right in their hands, or in their tip jar, or going up on stage to give the band a joint

 

 

as i said before music isnt and was never about money,

 

i just played a show on sunday, we GAVE our cd's away,

 

 

you have to pay money to live, you have to pay money to do anything, music is the only thing i care about and ill be damned if its gonna cost money too, its music, its bliss,

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This is a very difficult problem in intellectual property rights. It is so easy for anyone to be a music distrubutor these days, and we have MP3 players to accept the music. What can an artist do except make their money by means other than recordings?

 

CDs are still somewhat viable, but for how long?

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