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To change strings or not to change strings....


rbc

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I have a new G400 and I am just learning guitar.

I have heard some people say that the strings on new guitars are crappy and they change them immediately. To my untrained ear they sound fine.

I am more interested in "playability". When I purchased guitar I bought some DAddario super light .009 - .042 strings. Should I put these new strings on?

thanks

Randy

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Change the strings, get a tuner, and adjust the intonation.

 

I use D'Addario 9s on my Casino. I like them because they come with less packaging than many other brands, and they are sealed from moisture so I can buy a lot of them without worrying about them rusting before I put them on.

 

Also, I change the strings once a month, whether they need it or not =D>

 

Notes

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any strings i play at home i play till they snap. i don't really like new sounding strings! i like 9-42's. and do a setup and intonate on this gauge when they are new of course. 9's are usually whats on the guitar anyway. keep them on it and get the use out of them. why waste the money it's not for studio use?

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... I am just learning guitar...' date=' To my untrained ear they sound fine..., I am more interested in "playability". [/quote']

Don't change strings yet. "Old" does not equal bad. Use them to learn on, you said they sound good to you.

 

Changing strings on a T.O.M. bridge/tailpiece is a 1st timers headache b/c the pieces re-adjust without warning and you will invariably alter your setup/action. Seasoned veterans who have changed strings a lot tend to forget that. String buzz (low action) and high action both suck, and you will be heading to the repair shop or spending hours trying to figure out how to do your own setups. Either way its not a good way to start out learning guitar.

 

Concentrate on learning how to play now -- how to fix it comes later. Welcome to the forum and stick around for an earfull of good, bad, and just plain ugly advice.

 

Hit every BLUE NOTE baaaby..., I'm going to play on:-"

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If you change gauges the truss rod will probably need to be adjusted. If you don't know how to do that (it's easy) you should settle on what gauge strings you'll stick with before taking it somewhere to get adjusted so you only have to pay someone once. Then again, it may be ok.

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One thing worth mentioning, regarding light guage strings, is...that if you are just learning, you may have a

tendency to really "grip" the neck and push down harder on the strings, than is needed? So, light guage stings,

especially the high E, B, and G stings can go "sharp" in tone, from doing that. 10's or above, are not as bad,

but will require a bit more effort (and harder calluses), to acomplish the same thing. Light guage 9's are good...

just try to work on a light touch...only as much pressure as needed to get a clean note/chord. You can change

the strings, whenever you notice they're sounding dead...and, you'll be able to tell, soon enough. Enjoy!!

 

CB

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I would put the D'Addario strings on. The strings on the guitar could be on it for months/year(s).

.009-.042'' would give you no troubles' date=' this size is probably on the guitar.

 

New guitar.......new strings :-({|=

 

Peter[/quote']

 

Here, here Well Said that person! =D> I do this every time AND change strings every three months. When gigging I'll change every gig purely for safety, never broke a string yet!!

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I buy Ernie Ball Regular Slinkys, 10-46's by the case ( cheaper that way)

and install a new set as soon as I get a new guitar home.

Always check intonation after a good stretch.

After that, I change them when they "go dead" or flat, as CB said.

I haven't "gigged" in years, so they last a long time.

& whoever said to cut the strings, is right, less chance of scratching the headstock,

but close your eyes as you make each cut, i've been "flicked" in the eye b4

and its no fun at all.

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any strings i play at home i play till they snap. i don't really like new sounding strings! <...>

 

That is one of the things that makes music so interesting. The different ways we can express those same 12 note. Each musician has his/her own preferences and habits. There is definitely more than one right way to do it.

 

Personally, I really like the sound of new strings. The first two or three days on a set of strings are the best for me. But since I don't want to waste the earth's precious resources, I only change the strings about once a month.

 

But when I do, the clear tone of new nickel wound strings and my P90s just delight my ears.

 

Insights and incites by Notes

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Randy as you can see some guys like new strings...some guys don't. Here is the deal though...the stock strings on an Epi g-400 are not very good and may have well been on the guitar for months so changing them is a good idea. If you are not comfortable with changing them have it done at a store and have them show you how to do it correctly. Like anything else if it's not done right you are better off not doing it.

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Gents,thanks for all your replies.

I did change the strings and learned it is not difficult. Adjusted intonation OK.

The new strings sound louder/brighter.

Now if I can just learn to play the darn thing.

I am using Learn and Master guitar and am in the second session. I like that I am also learning how to read music.

Randy

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Gents' date='thanks for all your replies.

I did change the strings and learned it is not difficult. Adjusted intonation OK.

The new strings sound louder/brighter.

Now if I can just learn to play the darn thing.

I am using Learn and Master guitar and am in the second session. I like that I am also learning how to read music.

Randy[/quote']

 

You are on your way........now practice your *** off! Best of luck with your new addiction!

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Personally' date=' I really like the sound of new strings. The first two or three days on a set of strings are the best for me. But since [b']I don't want to waste the earth's precious resources[/b], I only change the strings about once a month.

 

But when I do, the clear tone of new nickel wound strings and my P90s just delight my ears.

 

 

Hah!..good one Notes. There is lots of good advice for him and some..well..(leave

them on until they rust/rot).. you know what I mean.

 

The strings that come on these asian guitars are basically recycled cars as far as

I'm concerned. They are hard to keep in tune, they rust like hell..and they don't

sound that good. The secret of good strings is the amount of nickel or stainless

that they add to the strings for better tone.

 

Don't forget that poorly made strings will not take the magnetic field from the

p_ups magnet well to build up their own magnetic strength..yes the strings

become magnetized..that's how it works..the magnet's main function

there underneath the coil(s) is to build up a magnetic field in the 6 strings over each

pickup. The coil(s) then senses the magnetized strings vibration and that

produces a weak waveform in the coil that goes to the volume pot.

 

The crappier the strings, the poorer the tone you can expect from the strings..

changing the strings will cause the p_up bar magnets to magnetize the

new strings..so just like ALNICO grades of magnets..the ingredients in

the nickel steel or stainless steel strings imparts a unique tone to the

strings and the guitar.

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<...snip...>I like that I am also learning how to read music.

Randy

 

Bravo! Learning to read music is something every musician should learn. Granted it is a little difficult at first, but in the long run it makes playing your instrument much easier. Plus it opens you up to things most non-readers ever experience, and will make you a better player in the long run.

 

Insights and incites by Notes

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Gents' date='thanks for all your replies.

I did change the strings and learned it is not difficult. Adjusted intonation OK.

The new strings sound louder/brighter.

Now if I can just learn to play the darn thing.

I am using Learn and Master guitar and am in the second session. I like that I am also learning how to read music.

Randy[/quote']

 

Remember, patience and don't move on until you are comfortable with the session you are on. Each session leads into the next. All the guitarist that you admire had to work their way to their current ability and most of them still work on it often to learn more and stay sharp. It's a never ending journey, so there is no rush to the finish line because it doesn't exist.

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Another point, if you loosen your strings, you run the chance of having the wrappings loosen and then the strings go dead. This happened to me when I did a fret dressing. I loosened the strings and moved them out of the way of the fingerboard and taped them back for a couple of hours, then re-tensioned them. DEAD as a doornail...like old flatwounds.

 

I also like the sound of new strings. If you don't care for the brightness, you can back off on the tone controls and still get that long, ringing sustain. When I bend a note and introduce a little vibrato, I want it to sustain a while for effect. Old strings don't do that. I average changing strings at least once a month, more often if they start to go dead sooner.

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