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I changed strings on one of my guitars this week and the new ones sound as dead as the ones I took off. I use D'Addario EJ16's and have never run into this before. Anyone have a similar experience?

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I changed strings on one of my guitars this week and the new ones sound as dead as the ones I took off. I use D'Addario EJ16's and have never run into this before. Anyone have a similar experience?

No never had that experience. But I use elixirs.

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A Product Marketing Specialist from D'Addario contacted me today regarding my original "Dead Strings" post. He apologized for the set that didn't work right for me and offered to send me a new set of factory fresh strings. I told him that I appreciated the offer, but that it wasn't necessary to replace them. I have used EJ16's for a while and like their feel and the tone they give me. I have never had a problem before and will continue to use them in the future. It's good to see D'Addario stand behind the products they sell and reassuring that customer service is important to them.

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Wow! That's impressive.

 

Indeed.

 

I've never had it happen with Elixirs, but

 

I'VE NEVER USED THE D'ADDARIO EJ16'S.......

 

[biggrin]

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I used to use D'Addrio's on acoustics,

 

Till I made the move about 12 years ago to Elixrs.

 

IMO, Nothing beats these for longevity, nothing...

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I used to use D'Addrio's on acoustics,

 

Till I made the move about 12 years ago to Elixrs.

 

IMO, Nothing beats these for longevity, nothing...

 

I agree with your last statement 100%!

I still remember the frustration of putting new strings on and the first week they would be too bright the second week perfect and the 3rd week dead.now with elixirs I can go 6 months and only change them because they have dents wherever the frets are but not on account of them being dead.

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^-

 

I have three acoustics that I play pretty regularly,

 

I change the strings on them about once every 8 or 9 months.. (I started keeping track of the dates of the string change just to see how long they would go..)

 

But they still sound perfect even after all that time, so the strings don't even NEED to go, it's mostly to condition the fretboard and give it a good buffing.

 

They are amazing strings in regard to life span.

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1433850376[/url]' post='1665451']

I used to use D'Addrio's on acoustics,

 

Till I made the move about 12 years ago to Elixrs.

 

IMO, Nothing beats these for longevity, nothing...

 

Agree.

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I have used just about every brand of acoustic strings out there at one time or another.

 

Elixrs last for sure but for me personally I dislike their feel and I'm not overwhelmed by their tone either, not that it's bad.

 

I seem to always come back to EXP 11's. They last me a decent amount of time of course depending on how much I play them on a constant basis on any one guitar.

 

On some of my Mahogany backed or walnut backed instruments I use EXP 16 phosphor bronze. Just like the tone of those on that type wood backed guitars.

 

Then again, my strings get changed on all my guitars about once a week, sometimes sooner depending again on how much I use that particular guitar.

 

I personally have never had any D'Addario strings perform dead right out of the package, not to say it couldn't happen. I have been playing just over 58 years now so I have had the chance for it to happen.

It's nice to see that they are concerned about customer satisfaction.

 

They (the EXP's) have a feel that doesn't seem "slippery" to me like Elixrs do.

 

Of course everyone has a different perception of what sounds and feels best to each individual

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I'm kind of reviving this sort of old thread because I was doing a search on dead strings. I normally change my strings (EJ-16's on virtually every guitar) every 30-60 days. Lately though I've encountered a couple of professional players playing Gibsons that WANT to leave old strings on their guitars. Joey Ryan of the Milk Carton Kids was the latest I've encountered. His are so old he doesn't even remember the brand and he keeps his guitar tuned down to D. So, since I have enough guitars to experiment I decided to just let the J-50's set go. I last changed them on 12/24/2014. Anyway I've really started to dig the tone I'm getting over time. I stay at standard tuning and I wipe the strings off after a session but the character of the tone is pretty much what I have always wanted out of this guitar. Go figure. Anyway if you are one of those people that do this I wouldn't mind hearing about how long you've kept a string set on and what you do to keep them going (if anything) and anything else you've noticed, or do, along the way. For instance, I have noticed that I've lost a little volume but the guitar more than makes up for that in soul. I think coated strings are an attempt to keep that new-set sound but I've never liked the feel of coated strings and now I'm thinking that there is something to just letting them get old and funky on a slope shoulder dread. I maybe should have started a new thread but if you've gotten this far....

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I'm kind of reviving this sort of old thread because I was doing a search on dead strings. I normally change my strings (EJ-16's on virtually every guitar) every 30-60 days. Lately though I've encountered a couple of professional players playing Gibsons that WANT to leave old strings on their guitars. Joey Ryan of the Milk Carton Kids was the latest I've encountered. His are so old he doesn't even remember the brand and he keeps his guitar tuned down to D. So, since I have enough guitars to experiment I decided to just let the J-50's set go.

 

I believe Em7 here is one who experiments a lot with old, "dead" strings. He may even artificially age them, and somewhere along the way, I seem to recalls him boiling them in some witches brew.

 

But then, I believe he sold his soul to the devil some time ago to be able to play and sing the way he does....

 

I've had mixed experience doing this. I experimented a bit last year, and left some Sunbeams on a couple of guitars (my 1948 J-45 with the 1968 top, and my Fuller's 1943 SJ re-issue) for about six months.

 

The old J-45 got funkier and funkier over time. It has sort of a classic old Gibsonesque tone anyway, with a thunky low end and fairly brash high end without a lot of sustain. That got more pronounced over time, to where you felt like you were listening to some old pre hi-fi recording.

 

The SJ maintained it's more modern scalloped-brace sustain and clarity, although the clarity deteriorated over time.

 

It was an interesting experiment, and depending on what you are playing, can be good or bad. If you like old-time stuff (think David Rawlings on his Epi archtop) it can give you a very different and appealing tonal quality. If you like "pretty", fuggidaboutit.

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No never had that experience. But I use elixirs.

 

I use Elixers too. High humidity weather makes most guitars sound dull. Theoretically picture it this way. Imagine the strings being muffled by the thicker humid air.

Sometimes I won't even bother picking my guitars on rainy days. Summer humidity is a ***** as well.

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I'm amazed at Lucille changing strings maybe more than once a week ! ?

 

Are you gigging every night ?

Or just a millionaire? :D

 

 

I don't do shows every single night but I spend a lot of time doing many different things guitar related such as writing, studio work, performing, practicing and such. I prefer the tone of new strings at all times. I like that fresh crisp tone as often as possible.

 

Let's just say money is not a major issue for me personally. I try to focus on music. I am fortunate and blessed when it comes to financial matters. I leave money issues to someone else.

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I don't do shows every single night but I spend a lot of time doing many different things guitar related such as writing, studio work, performing, practicing and such. I prefer the tone of new strings at all times. I like that fresh crisp tone as often as possible.

 

Let's just say money is not a major issue for me personally. I try to focus on music. I am fortunate and blessed when it comes to financial matters. I leave money issues to someone else.

 

In the early days of the Beatles they would remove and wash strings and then reuse them.

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It is all coming back to me - playing in blues bands and breaking a string was a total financial disaster! Now that was the time of old, stuffed strings.

 

I have had a day job for years and I recently converted to Elixir Lights PB or 80/20s and may even change them every few weeks - not rich, but bitter and twisted! Though I think I prefer Elixir PBs....

 

Some of the old bands' members are still flogging around, unbelievable but if I went to this guitar player's place tomorrow, he would probably be boiling old strings. Another guitarist was complaining about the strings being too high and when I asked him when he changed strings he said they came with the guitar! True! I said why dont you get the guitar set up properly by a tech and get at least some new strings......'Too dear! No money!' I almost gave him a set of my Elixirs, but he ruined that by eating my dinner and drinkng all my drinks..... [mellow]

 

 

 

BluesKing777.

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Wound strings accumulate oil and dirt from your fingers down into the coils. This added weight changes the frequency of their vibrating. The dirt and oil in between the coils mechanically constrict string vibrations. Dirty strings vibrate at slower frequencies than new strings.

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I used to use D'Addrio's on acoustics,

 

Till I made the move about 12 years ago to Elixrs.

 

IMO, Nothing beats these for longevity, nothing...

 

Wow 12 years on one set of strings - impressive :rolleyes:

 

Kiddin'

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Wow 12 years on one set of strings - impressive :rolleyes:

 

Kiddin'

 

I use Elixers too but I think there are other coated strings too. I may try the others next string change. I paid $22 for a set of Elixers I bought locally at my closest music store which wasn't that close. In fact I probably won't ever pay that much for strings again.

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just changed the strings on my les Paul custom using Gibson Humbucker Mediums and they are so dead. Sealed in foils. Dunno why. 

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On 6/16/2015 at 7:00 PM, j45nick said:

I believe Em7 here is one who experiments a lot with old, "dead" strings. He may even artificially age them, and somewhere along the way, I seem to recalls him boiling them in some witches brew.

Yups - he still does it now and again. It provides a mysterious blend between new, fresh and old played in, which is excellent for certain situations and guitars.                                                                               Make the water boil and sprinkle 5 drops of soap - then sink the wound up strings in the soup and let them stay there for 20 mins. Finally throw away the steel and add the fond to a sauce, dressing or marinade. You can also just serve it as tea. Yummi. . 

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On 6/20/2015 at 7:07 AM, Zentar said:

Wound strings accumulate oil and dirt from your fingers down into the coils. This added weight changes the frequency of their vibrating. The dirt and oil in between the coils mechanically constrict string vibrations. Dirty strings vibrate at slower frequencies than new strings.

There might be something to this.  I regularly gig and I find if I wipe down the strings every once in awhile with a dry paper towel, pressing hard on them as I’m doing that, it seems to rejuvenate the strings for awhile.  I also find that if at the half life of my strings, if I just change the wound 3rd string with a new one (I keep a supply of extra 3rd strings) and wipe down the others, the other strings are ready for their next half life.  Why the third string is the one to deaden first may have to do with dirt accumulating and not leaving the tighter wounds (is that a word?) of the third string.  But, whatever, it works and extends the time between changing an entire set of strings in my situation.

QM aka “Jazzman” Jeff

 

 

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