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Something I never noticed before on my J-35...shim under the nut


DRC

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I've never noticed this shim under the top portion of the nut on my J-35 until the light hit it just right today. Not a huge deal since it plays and sounds fantastic, but just odd to see something like this from a major iconic U.S. company like Gibson. This is more like something I'd expect from a $100 no-name guitar. Come on, Gibson. Really?

DC

 

Nutshim1_zps0abec85c.jpg

 

Nutshim2_zps09efa992.jpg

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It does look rather like a shim - the slots are awfully deep as well. Macro photos of things like this always play tricks with my eyes, but still... assuming it is, it seems unlikely (crossed fingers) to be a factory thing, but is there any chance a well meaning store guitar tech decided to deepen the slots and went a little too far?

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Did you purchase it first hand from an authorized dealer? If so, because it seems to be bothering you, I would politely call the dealer, or Gibson, and ask for a nut replacement. Since it plays and sounds great, if it were mine, I would sit back and play it. Okay. Going to do that now.

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BigKahune.... Yes, it's the original Montana nut. I bought the guitar only a couple days after the store received it from Gibson.

 

Sitedrifter.... What you're seeing is a string reflection from the flash. The TRC is fine.

 

Blindboygrunt.... Martin Retro lights. I've tried MANY different strings on it and the Retros have taken it to another level. Best strings I've had on the J-35.

 

Jayyj.... Photos can be deceiving. I'm a retired guitar tech, still do much of my own work and I filed the nut slots to suit my playing style and feel. The action was too high at the nut from the factory, but now is great with absolutely no buzzing, even when played aggressively.

 

DenverSteve.... Yes, it was purchased from an authorized dealer. I specifically said it wasn't a huge deal...and trust me, it gets a LOT of play time. The only thing that 'bothers' me is the way in which Gibson 'jerry-rigged' an obvious error in manufacture. When I get time, I plan to remove the nut, determine why the shim was used, and take care of it.

 

I just thought my fellow forum members would find this factory nut shimming interesting.

 

DC

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Interesting to the point of not amusing.... Does it appear to only be under the 6th string? If so, it would have to be tapered... Do you think it's just the nut that is uneven and needed to be jury rigged, or the neck? I agree with your observation of this being something you'd expect on a $100 guitar. I can't understand how this could have left the factory. If it's the neck, which would be my guess, I'd bring it back to the dealer for a replacement - no matter how much I loved it. G'luck.

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.... Martin Retro lights. I've tried MANY different strings on it and the Retros have taken it to another level. Best strings I've had on the J-35.

This inspired me to put a set I had lying around on the 2010 J-45 Standard (which had the same Martin Flexcore 12-54 on since Jan. 2012 and still sounded greatos).

First couple of strums make promise of a wedding - let's see. .

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This inspired me to put a set I had lying around on the 2010 J-45 Standard (which had the same Martin Flexcore 12-54 on since Jan. 2012 and still sounded greatos).

First couple of strums make promise of a wedding - let's see. .

 

keep us informed how they sound em7?

I'm an admirer of your playing and would be interested in what you think .

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If you ever saw a guitar set-up at the factory you would know this wasn't done at the plant. The nut slots are never cut that deep. Someone was trying to adjust the action and cut them to deep and then not having a nut they just shimmed the old one.

 

It probably wasn't done at the plant as the set-up tech would have tossed the nut that was cut to deep and put in a new one. It's much easier to just replace the nut than take the time to make a shim and then adjust it to fit. It's possible but certainly not something that a tech with a box full of proper fret nuts at hand would do. It would just take to much time and never pass inspection.

 

A new fret nut will cost a couple of dollars and if you asked Gibson would probably send you a hand full for free. It might be a good time to experiment with a couple of different materials just to see if there is any difference.

 

I'm not apologizing for Gibson. They just wouldn't or couldn't take the time to do this.

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