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Bluesy69

A Sad But True Cutting Corners Tale

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I never said that Epis were made by kids and yea I’ve seen this video. But child labor is something I don’t like... In the US there are laws against exploiting kids for profit. Not sure of the legal age but I am pretty sure a limit exists.

Edited by NighthawkChris

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No, that's the real Wild Bill!!

 

He did look like Dickey Betts with that 'tache didn't he?

Edited by jdgm

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Hey Guys,

 

Dont feed into this Asshat! Combine all the years from all of us here playing Gibson 2 and 1 piece backed guitars, you would think we know what were talking bout! Get the opinion ( no scratch that ) Knowledge of a guitar builder ( Rabs ) and still argue the FACT that good glue is alot stronger than un-glued wood. IMO <--------1 Piece is for appearance ONLY. EVERY guitar maker uses multi piece in the construction of the guitars. I wish some of these dip shits that complain about the cost of Gibson guitars would take into account the wage difference between the average USA worker and the average Chinese worker. OH and the PUSSNUTS that complain about the inconsistencies from 1 Les Paul to the next? I remember when i picked out my first Les Paul......i played about a dozen of them to find the ONE i liked best....none of them were the same. the beauty of the Les Paul is that they All have a SIMILAR Sound,Tone and Feel but are slightly different, you have the ability to find one that YOU as the player absolutely LOVE, the one that just FEELS right, the one that just has THAT sound....you will NEVER get that with a cookie cut guitar. I am NOT saying that Gibson is problem free, but they are NO worse than any other guitar company.

 

SORRY for the rant, but that POS is complaining about a 2 piece body on a $1100 USA made Guitar? HE STARTED IT! lol

 

Have a great day everyone, even the OP!

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1554660068[/url]' post='1986072']

Is the Les Paul Tribute not weight relived?

Regarding multiply pieces of timber, bonded sections are both stronger and more stable than a single piece, it's the norm in furniture manufacture. I know that because I trained as a cabinet maker in my youth.

 

 

Ian

The 2017 Tributes are, the 2018 Tributes are not.

 

 

 

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God Damn You Black Dog, Sitting at work and I cant stop Laughing......co-workers are looking at me but I DONT CARE! Great Effin Post Bro! =D>

 

if i could give you a +10 i would!

 

Thanks for that!

Yes.. that's an amusing video..

 

Did you ever see this one?

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My 2017 Tribute seems to have a two piece back. Not sure about my Traditional, Standard or Classic. None of those guitars suck and I really don't care much if they have a one piece back or 50. They sound good to me and seem to resonate just fine. The only reason I know the Tribute is two piece is because it has a little "birthmark" at the upper left and lower right corner. I couldn't tell you what my three Gibson V's have but I'm pretty sure no corners were cut on any of those guitars.

 

Back in ye olden days, before the internet, we'd just play guitars and they played well and sounded good or they didn't. I don't think I've ever discussed hide glue, two piece backs, long neck tenon, weight relief or any of that stuff. We discussed pickups and back in the day, if you didn't like your pickup, you went DiMarzio. Now there's so many different brands and different styles.

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i have never seen a picture of any electric guitar who's body broke at the glue joint. i'm sure it could happen if you ran it over with your silverado, but otherwise, it ain;t gonna happen.

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Yes.. that's an amusing video.....Did you ever see this one?......
msp_lol.gif

 

msp_thumbup.gif

 

Pip.

 

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Regarding a "properly" repaired famous LP headstock "smile" crack - one that is glued and clamped - what's the verdict on this here? Is it a stronger bond than what existed before the break? I'm guessing that this is not the same thing as gluing a couple blocks of wood together to make a 2-piece body, but curious what is said about this. Perhaps this question is more of a "depends on..." (case-by-case/too generic) type which makes this question unfair.

 

In my experience, I had a Gibson that I stripped down and gave it a guitar repair man near me to put a finish on it. It had the smile crack and the glue that was used was certainly hard as rock. This part is an unknown though in all fairness... I received the guitar with the "repaired" headstock crack from the guy I won an auction for it some time back. FYI, I needed some parts from this guitar, and I happened to get an "internet deal" on this. I figured I might as well see if this guitar can be made to play since I had this empty Gibson guitar body just laying around so to speak. Back to the repair, my local luthier was sanding it down to smooth it out a little more and in the process apparently broke the bond that glue made causing the crack to reemerge. He re-glued it again to his liking afterwards... Bottom line, I ended up bailing out on this project with that news, took my guitar home in the state as it arrived sort-of. He convinced me to do this because he didn't want me to have to pay for all the finish work and find out that later on whenever it may be that this perhaps will snap again on me. No harm no foul I suppose... This guy I sent my guitar is no cheat or hack - done good work on re-frets, cut bone nuts, and stuff like this in the past. He repairs a lot of instruments right out of his home for others and has for many years. He would have done what I told him to do - complete the refinish, but he just said quit while you're ahead here. I for one don't do these things - fret and (guitar) nut work - so I have no issues giving my stuff to someone I trust to handle these tasks for me. I don't have the time anymore these days being a dad of 2 little kids and working full-time. Hell, I'm lucky if I can play my guitar at 9pm to practice for my band let alone fine finish work on a guitar... I digress... This experience has lead me to believe that once you get a crack and repair it "properly", you have to be more careful with the guitar from then on out.

 

Here's my story, take it FWIW. Perhaps I should have started a new thread here on this, but we were talking about glue making wood stronger and all that... Just seeing if this is applicable in any way. Just don't know myself since I don't do a lot of woodworking and stuff of the sort. I usually believe someone with the most credible story, haha! msp_biggrin.gif I don't question the experts.

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Regarding a "properly" repaired famous LP headstock "smile" crack - one that is glued and clamped - what's the verdict on this here? Is it a stronger bond than what existed before the break? I'm guessing that this is not the same thing as gluing a couple blocks of wood together to make a 2-piece body, but curious what is said about this. Perhaps this question is more of a "depends on..." (case-by-case/too generic) type which makes this question unfair.

 

In my experience, I had a Gibson that I stripped down and gave it a guitar repair man near me to put a finish on it. It had the smile crack and the glue that was used was certainly hard as rock. This part is an unknown though in all fairness... I received the guitar with the "repaired" headstock crack from the guy I won an auction for it some time back. FYI, I needed some parts from this guitar, and I happened to get an "internet deal" on this. I figured I might as well see if this guitar can be made to play since I had this empty Gibson guitar body just laying around so to speak. Back to the repair, my local luthier was sanding it down to smooth it out a little more and in the process apparently broke the bond that glue made causing the crack to reemerge. He re-glued it again to his liking afterwards... Bottom line, I ended up bailing out on this project with that news, took my guitar home in the state as it arrived sort-of. He convinced me to do this because he didn't want me to have to pay for all the finish work and find out that later on whenever it may be that this perhaps will snap again on me. No harm no foul I suppose... This guy I sent my guitar is no cheat or hack - done good work on re-frets, cut bone nuts, and stuff like this in the past. He repairs a lot of instruments right out of his home for others and has for many years. He would have done what I told him to do - complete the refinish, but he just said quit while you're ahead here. I for one don't do these things - fret and (guitar) nut work - so I have no issues giving my stuff to someone I trust to handle these tasks for me. I don't have the time anymore these days being a dad of 2 little kids and working full-time. Hell, I'm lucky if I can play my guitar at 9pm to practice for my band let alone fine finish work on a guitar... I digress... This experience has lead me to believe that once you get a crack and repair it "properly", you have to be more careful with the guitar from then on out.

 

Here's my story, take it FWIW. Perhaps I should have started a new thread here on this, but we were talking about glue making wood stronger and all that... Just seeing if this is applicable in any way. Just don't know myself since I don't do a lot of woodworking and stuff of the sort. I usually believe someone with the most credible story, haha! msp_biggrin.gif I don't question the experts.

 

If I understand your story correct you just repaired a crack. To be fair, no enough glue is going to get into the crack to make a solid bond. Now if the head stock was completely separated from the neck it MIGHT be a different story. Like you said, it's hard to determine this when it come to the neck.

 

I do remember in shop class the teacher gluing (Elmer's) to several pairs boards together and breaking them. The boards never broke at the location where the boards were glued together, the glue is stronger that the wood. With that being said this whole thread is just silly,

Edited by Big Bill

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If I understand your story correct you just repaired a crack. To be fair, no enough glue is going to get into the crack to make a solid bond. Now if the head stock was completely separated from the neck it MIGHT be a different story. Like you said, it's hard to determine this when it come to the neck.

 

I do remember in shop class the teacher gluing (Elmer's) to several pairs boards together and breaking them. The boards never broke at the location where the boards were glued together, the glue is stronger that the wood. With that being said this whole thread is just silly,

 

Yeah, agreed this is a bit of a silly thread... My first post verifies that I share the sentiment. But since it was spawned, I had a turd of a question to ask to interject a legit question here since this story I described was more recent. As I was saying though, the guitar came to me "repaired" and I was seeing if there was any value in salvaging the body. I never repaired anything and gave the guitar to the luthier as-is when I won it in an auction; I only sanded it down to get rid of the solid color finish. And the idea that not enough glue made it into the crack seems pretty legit to me - it definitely wasn't a clean break... The luthier I gave the task to made it a clean break when he re-opened the crack, haha! At least he knew how the repair was done and what he was working with... He didn't like that crack from day one, but said WTF, let's see what happens.

 

FYI, you'd be surprised how many people bid on this body before I ended up selling it in a listing... Seriously, I listed it and it sold lightning quick - got asking price! I clearly showed that it was cracked and all that, but I ended up breaking even on the deal all said and done. I mean, I didn't have to pay that much when I won it in the auction, so that was a bonus.

 

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Apologies for the bluntness, but the amount of misinformation by OP is astounding. Not only OP is misinformed about the properties of a multi-piece back, but also on the specs of higher end Gibson USA like the LP Standard, Traditional and HP. Let's focus on the Les Paul Standard. According to Gibson spec pages, it uses a 2 piece mahogany body. Gibson have the spec pages for most models from 2015-2019 available for anyone to see (support > Gibson Guitar Specs "2015-2019" will take you to legacy.gibson.com).

 

  1. 2015: Explicitly stated in the spec page.
  2. 2016: Explicitly stated in the spec page.
  3. 2017: Explicitly stated in the spec page.
  4. 2018: Close inspection of the picture of the back of the guitar revels a two piece back.
  5. 2019: Close inspection of the picture of the back of the guitar revels a two piece back.

 

Now about those guitars having multi piece backs, I agree with whoever said it that the only true benefit of a one piece back is looks. If that's the case, I'm more than happy that they are using multiple pieces. As mahogany becomes more scarce and/or expensive, it is best to diminish wast of wood as much as possible.

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Hi @pauloqs,

This OP had this doozy of an 11-page thread about a couple years back:

http://forum.gibson.com/index.php?/topic/138435-3-strikes-your-out-prs-blows-you-away-gibson/page__p__1869526__hl__prs__fromsearch__1#entry1869526

I knew when I saw this OP and the title, it was going to be good msp_lol.gif When I first joined this forum, this was the thread that took center stage so to speak. I like to think of it as a first impression in the USA section of the forum.

 

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One piece of wood for a guitar body will cup, or curl, over time. Leo found out when top coats would separate, sometimes after not a long time. Gibsons will cause the binding to pull away, but probably over a longer time. Not dried to the right point and then painted is bad enough on guitars, one piece and not dried all the way is even worse. There are one piece backs that haven't curled in the least, and there are just gamillions of multi piece backed great guitars.

 

Basic guitar stuff. Woe was the day it was first uttered ONE PIECE BACK MAN!!!! on the old Harmony Central page, that vast repository of internet guitar wisdom.

 

rct

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Hi @pauloqs,

This OP had this doozy of an 11-page thread about a couple years back:

http://forum.gibson.com/index.php?/topic/138435-3-strikes-your-out-prs-blows-you-away-gibson/page__p__1869526__hl__prs__fromsearch__1#entry1869526

I knew when I saw this OP and the title, it was going to be good msp_lol.gif When I first joined this forum, this was the thread that took center stage so to speak. I like to think of it as a first impression in the USA section of the forum.

 

i wunder if the OP has cashed his PRS Pay cheque yet?

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Regarding a "properly" repaired famous LP headstock "smile" crack - one that is glued and clamped - what's the verdict on this here? Is it a stronger bond than what existed before the break? I'm guessing that this is not the same thing as gluing a couple blocks of wood together to make a 2-piece body, but curious what is said about this. Perhaps this question is more of a "depends on..." (case-by-case/too generic) type which makes this question unfair.

Short answer is YES.. A well repaired headstock break is usually stronger...

 

Theres another way of doing a headstock which is to chop the end off at an angle and turn it over to give you a headstock. Conventional wisdom says that this is a stronger joint than a one piece neck.

skvBYs2.gif

 

As for the actual repair... Depends on the exact break and what happened. Its known that when you use glue you should not use too much or too little.. Also when you clamp it up again, you must not put too much pressure on or it will squeeze the glue out making the joint weak.

 

This is a cool one I saw online the other day. This repair will definitely be stronger.

 

Theres also another thing about all of this which is the Mahogany they use. The sort of Mahogany that they use is called Genuine Mahogany and its hardness on the janka scale is only about 750.. Which is only JUST about strong enough for a neck, its the lowest number you would want. Any softer and it would just bend and snap. Hard Maple for instance is more like 1400... So its quite a difference. They should start using African Mahogany which is more like 1100 or as I have been using a lot recently Walnut (LOVE Walnut).

NhN3fCE.jpg

 

When you look at a cross section of the headstock and see how little wood there is on the neck heal, you have to wonder why they don't do something about it.. I really liked that Apex volute thing they were showing a couple of years ago.. they should do more of it

KQ7BI2q.jpg

 

cpXb31K.jpg

 

zOE0iAp.jpg

Edited by Rabs

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Hi @pauloqs,

This OP had this doozy of an 11-page thread about a couple years back:

http://forum.gibson.com/index.php?/topic/138435-3-strikes-your-out-prs-blows-you-away-gibson/page__p__1869526__hl__prs__fromsearch__1#entry1869526

I knew when I saw this OP and the title, it was going to be good msp_lol.gif When I first joined this forum, this was the thread that took center stage so to speak. I like to think of it as a first impression in the USA section of the forum.

You should have been here back in the old days.. Pre moderation.. It was like the wild west in here.. Imagine one of WildBills threads but with constant swearing and insults and about 15 of those threads all going on at once and you will get some kind of idea. To say you needed thick skin to be on here is an understatement.

 

While I do think this is a much nicer place because of the moderation, it has become somewhat boring over the last few years which is a shame as it really was one of the best guitar hang outs on the net at one point.

Edited by Rabs

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