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I need some advice


NeoLibMan

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Adult.

Me.

I need a hobby.

 

I hope to keep playing' date=' but I've heard if you get the cheap ones you will be less likely to continue playing. Any truth to that?[/quote']

 

Yes there is tons of truth to that... I started learning on a Gibson Les Paul at age 51. Everyday I picked up the guitar like a kid with new shoes... You are going to go threw enough hell as it is. Frustration on how difficult it is to change from one chord to the other, boring finger exercises, scales, not to mention physical pain, raw finger tips... etc. But if you stick with it the rewards are worth it. Start out on a crappy guitar and the begging process is 50 times worse. Don't get a guitar that fights your best efforts get the guitar that you want to keep and be proud of all your life... If it turns out you give up the guitar doesn't have to sit in a closet. You can sell the guitar and get most of your money back if it is a good guitar...

 

Go for it... Don't give up! It's very difficult at first and seems as though it's impossible but it gets easier and as it does you enjoy it more and more....

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Worn?

Does that mean substandard? Or a finish issue?

Do you have a link. I like the idea of getting a gibson.

Gibson has a good reputation. At least I think they do.

I'm on the Gibson forum I'd guess that's the only thing I'm going to hear.

 

Not true, I think the guys on this forum are just as hard, if not hard on Gibson than anyone else.... We want Gibson to be the best, after all we are Gibson owners but when they scew up we let them know it...

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You can get an electric guitar and amp kit for $200 - $400. That's what I would do and I wouldn't spend anymore than that. For the money, I think Fender Squire Stratocasters are excellent guitars. I have a $180 Squire Strat and I like it more than my $1,000 American Strat.

 

You can also get a pretty decent acoustic guitar for around $300.

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You can get an electric guitar and amp kit for $200 - $400. That's what I would do and I wouldn't spend anymore than that. For the money' date=' I think Fender Squire Stratocasters are excellent guitars. I have a $180 Squire Strat and I like it more than my $1,000 American Strat.

 

You can also get a pretty decent acoustic guitar for around $300.[/quote']

 

+1

 

No need to overspend. Yamaha makes amazing-quality guitars at all price points.

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My two cents would be to buy a real Gibson, if you can afford it - say a "faded-finish" studio like this one: http://guitars.musiciansfriend.com/product/Gibson-Les-Paul-Studio-Electric-Guitar?sku=517030 for around $800. These are made with a thinner, less-shiny finish, and seem like great guitars. A number of guys on here have them.

 

I concur that it's a great feeling to have a nice guitar to learn on, and that you can sell it and get most of the money out of it if you quit.

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You should buy a Gibson acoustic.

That way you never have to worry about an amplifier.

Get an acoustic guitar, learn how to play and then worry about an electric guitar and amplifier.

Buy the time you've figured out if you want to keep playing, you will have tried several electrics in music stores.

Gibson J-45 Standard

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You can find a good guitar for around $300-400 that will suit you just fine for several years or until you start hanging around here and get a jones on for seven or eight different Gibsons. Look at brands like Epiphone, Fender (the Made in Mexico Fenders are good and not expensive), Ibanez, Schecter and Yamaha.

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IF you truly love the sound of electric guitar, and if music is key in your life, then go for it. You will discover soon enough if the music is in your head, or in your heart. If it is in your heart, then you have a great chance at success. It becomes a matter of figuring out how to make the guitar sound like what your heart is telling you.

Does that sound too deep? Hope not.

If you can afford a good guitar, then I agree it will be a benefit to you. I on the other hand had to rough it out with junk during my early years and I think that has different benefits. Learning how to make a crappy guitar sound good pays off in dividends when you finally get a quality one, and perhaps even makes you appreciate good wood even more.

 

As long as you take care of it...(Plenty of resources to teach you how-Internet) you will be able to sell that $1,000 guitar for $500 at least. So if you don't continue to play, you won't have invested much to find out, but you will be ahead of the game if it becomes an obsession in your life.....It is an obsession BTW:-"

 

As others have stated though, if you decide not to spend that much...Epiphone is a good start

If you like the SG style, then the G-400 is the way to go. If you like Les Pauls, then a 4 or $500 model will work.

 

You will find in music stores guitar and amp (Ready to play) combo's. Keep in mind that if you get a guitar and amp in a box for $300 strap and cable included, you will be getting very low quality gear. You will need to spend around $500 minimum for both in order to have any decent sound. IMO

 

OR....You could do like alot of us and get a $300 acoustic. Learn on it first then worry about electric later.

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You really don't need to spend a lot of money right now . I agree with ARE9 . If you stick with it, half the fun is trying out all the nice guitars when your ready.

 

It took me 20 years before I bought my first Gibson. Make yourself earn it.

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I'd go with something in the Gibson/Epi family or anyone else that makes a 24 3/4" scale guitar (easier to press the strings down and the frets are slightly closer).

 

An Epiphone Casino is a good choice if you like light weight guitars that can be played acoustically as well as plugged in. I have one and I love it.

 

My Epiphone Casino is built as well as my Gibson ES-330. The difference is the quality of woods, finish, and electric parts.

 

If you like solid guitars, an SG or Les Paul would be good choices. Again, you can get more guitar for the money if you go Epiphone - but there is less prestige with the Epiphone brand name than the Gibson one.

 

I have a very cheap LTD guitar, and the build is excellent. I didn't like the sound of the pickups - too heavy metal in tone - so I replaced them - but the neck is fast and comfortable and it is a solid guitar.

 

Rondo Music ->LINK<- has a great reputation for low priced guitars. I've never owned one, but I have read many raves about them.

 

Here is my Casino, 330 and LTD

 

GuitarFamily.JPG

 

Notes

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I agree with both Tim and Dave... which have completely different opinions on the subject :-

 

1.-You can get a really nice guitar, it will encourage you to play more and learning will be easier.

 

or

 

2.- You can get a starter pack (squier, epiphone or whatever) and use that till you know for sure you are going to keep on playing.

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