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What era were you born in vinyl records..


4Hayden

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1452919106[/url]' post='1730873']

8 track , cassette , reel-to-reel , CD's ect...

 

The record player was our first thing we had when I was little. The 8 tracts came out when I was in school and had them in my 67 Barracuda my junior year. Didn't want to give them up for the cassets, but later did. Same thing when the cd's came out. Still have some cassettes and lots of albums and single records. Still have a turntable, cassette player and C D player.

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The 8 tracts came out when I was in school and had them in my 67 Barracuda my junior year.

 

My first car was a '74 VW Beetle. It was equipped with a "radio prep package", which consisted of a hole in the dash into which you could insert the radio of your choice. I'm not kidding, this was actually listed as an option on the build sheet! I put a cassette player in the hole.

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When I was born 57 years ago today, 33 1/3 and 45 rpm vinyl records had just taken over from the 78 rpm shellac records. Some people had an analog two-track mono tape recorder. One of these has been my first approach to tape recording at the age of four, accidentally the same year compact cassette was introduced. With the advent of stereo tape recording four-track analog was widely spread for offering the same playing time in stereo while sacrifing about 4dB S/N ratio. I didn't own one though but a mono cassette recorder only. When compact cassette went HiFi, I turned to using it for about two decades.

 

All of my "black discs" - OK, there are some coloured among them - are vinyl. I never owned shellacs. In 1991 I switched to CD.

 

After using a Fostex X-15 4-track cassette recorder from the mid-1980's on, I did my first step into digital recording with a 32-track Korg D32XD in 2005. Man, what a leap in quality! I still use it and some Korg D3200 32-track studios, too.

 

8-track analog cassettes and the related devices never played a role here.

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I was born in 58 and was the youngest of five. I remember going to the record shop with my sister and standing in a booth to listen to records before she bought them. Then in my teens Virgin records opened in Birmingham. Just a small shop where you could listen on headphones before you bought. It's not the same now. We had no internet so had to buy music papers and then wait until the record was released. The anticipation of buying it and walking home to play it. Great.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P29j2IP7nYA

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I was born in the early 50s - there were the 33-1/3 LPs, and the 45 single play and EP formats. Most of the recordings were produced in mono. I had some 45 single play records as a little kid, but in the early to mid 60s when I began to buy my own recordings, 45 single play records were the king. I started to get into LPs in the mid 60s and by the late 60s that's all I was buying.

 

 

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I was born in 1960 so records were the default in my household. My father was an old cowboy ballad singer so I was swamped with 78s too. Not many 8 or 9 year olds with a collection of 78s in the 60s but I was one.

 

My brother bought a new Automatic Radio 4 and 8 track player for his car in 1968. I still have that player. It is a big paperweight. I used it in the late 70s, playing the Cars, Bob Seger, The Rolling Stones, the B52s and Bowie's "Ziggy" album in my '66 Buick.

 

I bought a used portable cassette recorder in 1974 but finding pre-recorded cassettes then was a novelty. 8 tracks were much more common. I got a Panasonic 8 track deck to incorporate into my stereo for Christmas 1974 and I think I used it a week.

 

In 1974 my father bought a used Sony TC-630 reel to reel, which I commandeered and used with my stereo. I would tape songs off the radio. I ended up buying it from him in 1981 for $100 and in 1985 I traded it for a Telecaster.

 

I didn't buy my first CD until 1995. Soundtrack to Pulp Fiction. I have a CD player in my Impala and I have 4 or 5 CD notebooks in the trunk. 55 mile commute ya know.

 

I have a stereo set up downstairs with a direct drive turntable, EQ, cassette deck, Teac reel to reel (or Akai? I don't recall), and an old 78 RPM turntable I robbed from a 1948 console and built a wooden base for. I never use it because one channel of the Technics receiver keeps cutting out and I'm too lazy to go shopping on ebay for a vintage 70s receiver.

 

I've actually got an old 1971 Audiotronics school record player I will use if I want to just drop the needle on something.

 

One of these days I will find a hideous 1960s console and I will put it in the man cave. A big ol' Magnavox or similar.

 

I also have a 1970s Russco turntable from a local radio station but I don't feel like paying $200 for a used tonearm.

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Born 1984, so the beginning of the CD era, but all the albums I bought when I was young in the 90's were on cassette and I had a few vinyl records too. Eventually I made the transition to buying CD's around 1999/2000, but still bought a fair few vinyl, however, I stopped buying cassettes all together by that point.

 

I still have all my cassettes, vinyl & CD's and will never get rid of them.

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So many greats were born in February of 1960!

 

And at least one 'not so great' born in February 1950.

 

The 1st record player I remember was a big crank up victorola at my grandparents house. Big Thick Platters!

 

The 1st one we had in our house was a large piece of furniture in blond. It would not only play records, 78 and 33 1/3 I think, but we could cut our own recordings on what I think was wax coated cardboard. Dad was non-musical so he made voice recordings to send to my grandmother.

 

It got traded off for a new B&W TV in about '56 and I wouldn't get my 1st actual record player until about 1958 or 9. The green & white standard of the age in 78/33 1/3 &45.

My 1st tape recorder was cassette in '69 when I went into the military.

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The green & white standard of the age in 78/33 1/3 &45.

 

You're forgetting 16rpm. I'll bet yours, like mine also had a setting for 16rpm.

 

I was born in the late 78rpm era. By the time I could buy my own records, 45s were the rage, and if you could swing it, maybe a couple of 33 &1/3 LPs. I do remember having a couple of 16rpm records, but those were story records for kids. Like 45s, they were also 5 inches and turned so slowly that it was unbelievable and hypnotic to watch.

 

Stereo was huge when it hit, but I continued buying mono for a few years because they were a buck cheaper than the stereo counterparts.

 

I jumped all over stereo FM when it went pop around 1965 or so. Not that I owned a stereo tuner yet, but there were so many fewer commercials!

 

I was always fascinated by recording, so I got my first mini portable reel to reel probably around 1966 or 1967.

 

And boy, how many others would stack a couple of coins on the end of their tone arm to plow through a skip on their favorite records?

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