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When did you convert?


Izzy

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I read an article that said my generation (Generation X) is a very brand loyal generation.

For years I've always gone for VOX amps. Everything else I'm like [-( For NO reason other than "sparkle" and the feeling I get knowing I identify with it(?) Very odd.

 

A friend has been on a quest for a new amp. He is less brand driven than me. He just tries all things that may fit his style and sound. Because he's been testing out so many different brands and I've tagged along...I sort of accidentally have tried non-Vox amps [blush] Dr. Z, Morgan, Mesa...

 

Turns out Fender's '57 Custom Deluxe is the greatest amp I've heard until now. And I'm considering it. Strongly.

 

This is like the time when I turned to Fender after years of only playing Gibson. That, "Jesus, what took me so damn long!?!" moment.

 

Do you have a moment that made you go..."Why didn't I try this out sooner, good God!?!?" (musically or otherwise)

What was it?

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Do you have a moment that made you go..."Why didn't I try this out sooner, good God!?!?" (musically or otherwise)

What was it?

 

Gibson's Nighthawk.

 

For years, I discounted them out of hand, based on looks alone... judging a book by its cover.

 

Came the fateful day I had an opportunity to physically pick one up - the size, the scale, the weight, the neck - they all add up to probably the most comfortable guitar I can imagine. Plenty of usable sounds in a stock two-pickup Nighthawk, and I can see the folly of my narrow-mindedness. Complete 180.

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Great topic!

 

 

For me my biggest "AH HA" moment was probably my first Telecaster...........I'd always like the looks of them, but had never owned one....I'd had Strats, Les Pauls, etc.......but when I finally went Tele shopping and brought one home, I was amazed at how versatile they can be. Now I'm addicted to them.

 

Second place was P90's..........Lots of my favorites use them, but I had never tried them. Love them now.

 

NHTom

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Yeah I had a moment that made me ask, "Why didn't I try this out sooner".

That would have been after I bought my first electric guitar/amp, brought it home, and plugged it in.

 

You see, I had been a drummer since the age of 13. I was now 41. My brother played the guitar, and we jamned together a lot growing up.

I messed around with his guitars, but never that much.

 

That was 11 years ago. Now I own 15+ guitars, multiple amps and play them as much or more than my drum sets.

Wish I had done it a lot sooner! :)

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I've always played a P-Bass and never even touched a Jazz Bass. I picked up an American Special Jazz bass in a trade and wondered why I hadn't done it sooner because it just felt perfect. Stupidly, I sold the Jazz bass and still don't own one because I'm afraid I'll dump all my P-Basses...

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Always loved my Gibsons so no real brand change for me...

 

The only thing I can think of is when I got my LP DC Special which was my first lighter slab body guitar which was a revelation in itself AND probably more importantly my first P90s..... I do think I actually prefer the sound of them to humbuckers...

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So many epiphanies so little time... [biggrin] But I'll weigh in.

 

If you are using both single coil and humbucker guitars through the same rig, you will benefit from dramatically lowering the pickups on the humbucker guitars (and avoiding high gain humbuckers). This was a struggle for me for many years.

 

Booster pedals... why doesn't everyone use these? They make everything juicier. They fall into the "always on" pedal category. Wish I had known this years ago.

 

Tube amps... nothing like them. And the simpler the better - no printed circuit boards - volume and tone is all you really need. The best sounding amps seem to have the fewest knobs.

 

Mods: so much stock stuff sounds like a$$. Stock wahs? Nope. A few parts and they really sing. So many tweaks to improve the stuff we use. Tube swapping, cap changes, speaker swaps, it never ends!

 

Treble bleeds - why did I spend so many years unable to turn down the volume due to the mud. Now it's the first mod to any guitar I buy.

 

On a more esoteric level, trust yourself and your instincts as a player. Once you know some stuff, you just gotta relax and let your personality out through the guitar. You can spend way too much time practicing and overthinking things. Just close your eyes and let it flow.

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Great topic!

 

 

For me my biggest "AH HA" moment was probably my first Telecaster...........I'd always like the looks of them, but had never owned one....I'd had Strats, Les Pauls, etc.......but when I finally went Tele shopping and brought one home, I was amazed at how versatile they can be. Now I'm addicted to them.

 

...

NHTom

 

Mine's about the same. I'd sort of avoided Teles because of the (presumed) association with country. But, I had a project I wanted to try that needed twang instead of squawk, and I had the money and opportunity to pick up a Tele. Now it's sort of my go-to. Not my favorite, but somehow it's always "right".

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Tried a Gibson Les Paul mid way through my Fender Strat days (20 years).

The fingerboard felt small. Like a toy. The sound was muddy. Didn’t take to it at all.

 

Gibsons? I just needed a little more time and didn’t know it.

Adjust the EQ & back off the volume for the sound.

Handling? Just play it for a few days more…

 

I bought my first Gibson in 2015. An ES-339 Studio. Before the year was out I bought another.

 

In the last 12 years or so, I seem to be able to adapt to anything. My Spanish acoustic is full 26” scale, 2” wide nut and zero radius. Action like a trampoline. Love it.

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Gibson's Nighthawk.

 

For years, I discounted them out of hand, based on looks alone... judging a book by its cover.

 

Came the fateful day I had an opportunity to physically pick one up - the size, the scale, the weight, the neck - they all add up to probably the most comfortable guitar I can imagine. Plenty of usable sounds in a stock two-pickup Nighthawk, and I can see the folly of my narrow-mindedness. Complete 180.

 

 

Yes indeed.....agree strongly with that sentiment.....[biggrin]

 

IMO the Nighthawk is an easy handling Firebird, Les Paul and Strat all in one neat package

 

Looks good and beautifully built too.....[thumbup]

 

V

 

:-({|=

 

PS Referring to the 3 P/U version.....:blink:

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Ha!, funny topic! I never really converted to another guitar maker as Gibson & Epiphone was it for me from a young age. My first electric guitar was a limited edition Epiphone honeyburst LP 100 that I got in 1996 which I still own and love, shortly followed by a Gibson LP Studio which was bought with help from my parents 1998. Since then I've bought another 19 Gibson's and 13 Epiphone's. I do have a few Fenders & a Gretsch and although I like them, I wouldn't say I'm crazy about them. The guitar that really impressed me recently was the Godin 5th Avenue Kingpin which I picked up last year. Fantastic instrument, but I still feel most happy with a Gibson LP, SG, archtop or acoustic. I've tried many other guitars in my life like Ibanez, Jackson, Martin, Burns, etc, but none feel as good as a Gibson or Epiphone to me. Classical guitars are a bit of a different story, which I won't bother going into.

 

Amp wise, for years I loved Marshall, but then about 12 years ago discovered Fender amps. Wow!, I switched over straight away. I still like Marshall, but Fender were a revelation. Like with guitars I've tried lots of amps over the years, especially when I was in music college. They had all sorts from Cornford to Messa's, but Fender amps were the only ones that really stood out for me.

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My eye opening moment came about in the last couple of years. I had always been a tube amp snob; solid state/ modelling amps were for " entry level" players. Not that I was opposed to trying new tech (from solid state amps, rack units and pedals) but they never could compete with tube amps.

 

Fast forward to 2015 and the Kemper profiling amp and...wow! Everything is turned upside down. Not only does it sound and play like a tube amp but I can profile my own tube amps. My mind was "blown"! This amp is everything I had hoped for and then some. So much so that I have sold off most of my tube amps, except for a few small wattage ones.

 

I have now become a Kemper snob, lol. [biggrin]

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For years I've always gone for VOX amps. Everything else I'm like [-( For NO reason other than "sparkle" and the feeling I get knowing I identify with it(?) Very odd.

 

Turns out Fender's '57 Custom Deluxe is the greatest amp I've heard until now. And I'm considering it. Strongly.

 

 

It doesn't surprise me that a Vox fan would like a Fender Deluxe. The Fender Tweed Deluxe is probably more like a Vox than it's like a Blackface amp like a Fender Deluxe Reverb. The Deluxe is rawer sounding and compresses more than newer Fenders. The Tweedle Dee version of the Deluxe is the sweetest sounding Tweed type amp you'll ever hear, bar none. [thumbup]

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Gibson's Nighthawk.

 

 

I tried one of these and really liked it! Very very cool. I just can't let myself own SO many guitars, it is crazy! But really, the comfort and sound makes it a BAD A$$ little devil.

 

@ badbluesplayer

 

YES!! I have played other Fenders and this thing is ... like, I want my fingers to control the way the sound comes out of the amp. I mean, if I strum hard I expect breakup and when I pluck softly, I expect shimmery clean sounds without touching the amp settings. This amp gives me the low end I never had with Vox AND the sparkle and the control. [wub]

 

There are some interesting answers here. I'm actually surprised by the Tele converts. Teles are pretty damn sweet. [thumbup]

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Hmmmm, I guess My "Ah ha" moment was not so much about guitar brands, as a re-awakening, to a model

I used, as a much younger player. The SG! I had gone through several ('61 SG "Les Paul" Junior, the

first Electric guitar, and Gibson, I ever played, to a '64 SG Custom, then '68 SG Standard), back then!

Then, in '72, I sold everything, and stopped playing, altogether. Sure, I looked at guitars, off and on, for years after...

mostly out of curiosity, as to what was the current "rage," in them. When I finally (30 years later)

got the "bug," to get back into playing, I bought a Les Paul (my 2000 LP Classic), and looked at SG's

again, but didn't really care for the then current beveling and lack of horn tapering. Then, in late

2012, Gibson USA (finally) offered some versions that appealed to my "bevel and horn tapering" snobbery. [flapper][biggrin]

And, I (basically) went SG "Crazy!" Bought 4, in less than a year, and (for me) one of the best decisions I've

made, guitar wise, lately.

 

Amps, I've always pretty much been a tube amp, person. Marshall, Fender, Vox, mostly. No more than I

play "out," anymore...spending the kind of money, the boutique amps, too often, require, is a non-starter,

for me. IF I was playing all the time (weekly), I'd have no problem spending that kind of money. But,

for now, my "old" Fenders, Vox, and Marshall amps will do just fine. A/B boxes, allow use of 2 (at least)

at a time, if wanted/needed. Never mind the plethora of effects pedals. So, it's all good! But, there is a

lot to be said, for the KISS (Keep It Simple, Silly) approach. One's favorite guitar(s), and a great amp

alone! BUT, guitar players often tend to be "fickle," back and forth. So...???

 

 

CB

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I played a Gibson Flying V for decades. I love that guitar. I bought a new Les Paul and I've played it almost non-stop since February. The neck feels about the same, the tone is amazing. I don't know if I'm totally converted or not because my 81 V will always have a special place in my heart.

 

Amps are another story. I went from a piece of junk amp (Sears or something) to a Fender Twin Reverb (Loved that amp until it blew), Peavey Bandit 60, Randall half-stack, upgraded to full stack, Crate something or other (still have it as a practice amp), sold the Randall, got a little Fender Mustang (which I love the sound and capabilities of it), another Randall half-stack with tube pre-amp, and then, to my surprise, a Marshall. I had played a few Marshalls over the years and they all weren't that much to write home about. Combos, 50 watt, 100 watt, mini stack, etc. I never liked them. I bought a little Marshall combo, 100 watt, put it through my Randall cabinet. That Marshall and Les Paul combination is the best sound I've ever had. Cutting back the volume or tone, pulling the coil tap, switching channels and I've got all the sounds I need for the kind of music I'm playing these days. I loved my Randall and got great sound out of it over the years. My next purchase is going to be a Marshall half stack and probably another Fender Twin Reverb. I really miss that amp. Probably a Fender Telecaster too, because I like the way they play.

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What mods are you incorporating BBP?

 

I loooooooooooove the sound of my Deluxe build!!! Not much to say really, I freakin love it. Would love to try out one of your builds BBP

 

Here's the Deluxe schematic & layout with the Tweedle Dee mods in red pencil. Forget the send and return arrows before the second tube. That doesn't work.

 

20160201_124309_zpspwtdgske.jpg20160201_123242_zpsmi8f3sni.jpg

 

Other differences -

 

This amp has a Weber British style 1230 speaker, which is kind of like a cross between a Greenback and a V30. It's more midsy than an American style speaker.

There's lots more filtering capacity, with an extra node and doubled cap sizes. Voicing is less bassy and the flabby/farting problems are solved. It doesn't really fart out. It just digs in. You can adjust the voicing on the two channels by changing the values of the first coupling caps on each channel. Those are the ones that are .1 on the original and .022 in red. I think this amp ended up with a .047 on the bright channel and .076 on the normal channel. The cap on the tone control is different. Other misc. stuff as shown.

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Here's the Deluxe schematic & layout with the Tweedle Dee mods in red pencil. Forget the send and return arrows before the second tube. That doesn't work.

 

20160201_124309_zpspwtdgske.jpg20160201_123242_zpsmi8f3sni.jpg

 

Other differences -

 

This amp has a Weber British style 1230 speaker, which is kind of like a cross between a Greenback and a V30. It's more midsy than an American style speaker.

There's lots more filtering capacity, with an extra node and doubled cap sizes. Voicing is less bassy and the flabby/farting problems are solved. It doesn't really fart out. It just digs in. You can adjust the voicing on the two channels by changing the values of the first coupling caps on each channel. Those are the ones that are .1 on the original and .022 in red. I think this amp ended up with a .047 on the bright channel and .076 on the normal channel. The cap on the tone control is different. Other misc. stuff as shown.

Thanks for posting your schematic BBP! I've seen a lot of people reduce coupling cap values to mitigate bass blocking, but you've gone a few steps further!

 

I would really love to be able to A/B your modded version with my build that I'm familiar with

 

I don't have a lot of speaker options, but my build sounds amazing with my Weber 12F150 and Celestion Gold at the same time. That combo is so sweetly balanced, I gotta get another Gold to use in an extension cab

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My Epi LP PlusTop Pro was a big AHA! moment for me. I was surprised how close I could get to the Slash tone with it. It sounds like a Gibson - it really does.

 

Unfortunately, the fret wire's crap. It's not time to re-fret just yet, but I can tell it wears unusually quick. Re-fretting it will cost as much as the guitar did. I'm gonna do that down the line, though - it sounds THAT good.

 

I'd have liked to have the option of paying another hundred bucks for the same guitar but with good fret wire.

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The older I get the more I like solid state amps, foot pedals can do wonders for them and you don't need a chiropractor every time you lift them.

 

LOL, I hear THAT!! The only "solid state" amps I own, are a Marhsall AVT-20, and an old 1982 Fender (Japan) Sidekick Reverb 35.

I've had the Fender for decades, and it's NEVER given me any trouble. I did have it modified, wherein the foot switch that turned

on the reverb, was changed to turn the "distortion" on and off, instead. I tend to set the reverb on it, for just a little ambiance,

and leave it. I use it, now, mostly as a "spare" to my "Blues Jr." for bar gigs! However, today I daisy chained it, to the little

Marshall, and "WOW!" What an awesome sound. I had to do the Sidekick first (it has 2 inputs), then to the Marshall. I may try

that, at our next club or bar gigs. Probably get thrown out, for being "Too Friggin' Loud," but it's worth a try, anyway. [biggrin]

 

For the places we're "allowed" to play, around here anymore, ALL my other (tube) amps, are too big/loud, at their "sweet spots," so I have

to use a pedal, to get any kind of "fuller" tone, anyway. So, the real advantage to a "valve/tube" amp, is (basically) lost, in that circumstance! [unsure]

 

I have been eyeing the Solid State Fender Champ series. But, we'll see??!

 

 

CB

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