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What type picks do you use ?


brc

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Kind of got into a discussion with a friend of mine yesterday, about the type guitar pick he is using.

I noticed he was using a Dunlop 0.38. Waffer think and I could hear “ pick slap “ is what I call it as he was playing.

 

I suggested a little thicker pick to get away from the noise of the pick.

 

When I was playing, I used a combination of a thumb pick, and two thin finger picks, and then a thin to medium when playing some country licks,finger picks with my index, and middle finger

I was into the Chet Atkins style with the thumb pick which I really enjoyed playing.

 

What style picks ( thumb or straight picks) are folks using these days.

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If you still lived here I’d be buggin you to teach me some of that Chet Atkins style picking. I’ve always had a hard time with those thumb and finger picks. Then I get frustrated and go back to using bare fingers

 

I like to use those Fender celluloid picks. I like the medium and heavy, sometimes the thin one is good if you’re playing a 12 string.

 

One thing I’ve noticed about the celluloid Fender picks.. if you play really fast alternate picking for a long time, the pick will heat up and it smells exactly like Vick’s vapo rub. I imagine that **** Dale’s left hand smells like Vick’s vapo rub all the time

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Hey there Mr. T

What the hell up ?

There are times when I wish I still did live in So Ca.

Kind of ironic, that we discover we actually lived maybe 20/30 min. from each other and did not start talking until I move 1/2 way around the world.

What I did when I started playing the alternating bass with my thumb was, just make it a point that I spent certain amount of time while I was playing/ practicing, and to set at least 20 min. for just the practice of using the thumb pick and do it over and over and over until it came naturally .

I started that style probably in the late 1960s, maybe early 1970s.

You will get so tired of the same thing, but even if you are sitting down watching TV, just grab a guitar and do it over and over .

But set a certain amount of time each time you play, to practice the alternating bass run.

When I was teaching guitar, I had lessons just for the Atkins/Travis style, even though they sound some what the same, the are completely different styles.

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Kind of got into a discussion with a friend of mine yesterday, about the type guitar pick he is using.

I noticed he was using a Dunlop 0.38. Waffer think and I could hear “ pick slap “ is what I call it as he was playing.

 

I suggested a little thicker pick to get away from the noise of the pick.

 

When I was playing, I used a combination of a thumb pick, and two thin finger picks, and then a thin to medium when playing some country licks,finger picks with my index, and middle finger

I was into the Chet Atkins style with the thumb pick which I really enjoyed playing.

 

What style picks ( thumb or straight picks) are folks using these days.

 

I buy Dunlop 1.0s, but I’ll play with whatever is laying around.

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I use them all.

 

Thick and thin.

 

Dunlops and Fenders. And every brand in between.

Textured and smooth.

All colours.

 

I don't leave the house without a pocket full of guitar picks.

 

My music room has around forty or so picks set in various spaces, and my wallet drawer houses over a hundred picks.

 

They are my stock in trade, my currency to the music of tomorrow, my thin, plastic daggers of redemption and hope.

 

Okay, I'm gonna shut up now.

 

[mellow] :unsure: [crying]

 

how-to-choose-a-guitar-pick-by-genre.jpg?fit=1023%2C682

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Fender heavy 351s, buncha pearloid colors. I have a few RCT picks from the last gross, they are about 15 years old now. They are 1.41mm delrin type stuff, made by a guy in Ohio. I don't know if he's around any longer so I don't use the last couple I have.

 

rct

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Sounds like more players are using a much thicker pick than what I used to use.

I just could not used to a thick pick.

I pretty much used a very think style, whether it was for my thumb, or fingers.

Can you imagine how many picks you would go through in your lifetime ?

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Sounds like more players are using a much thicker pick than what I used to use.

I just could not used to a thick pick.

I pretty much used a very think style, whether it was for my thumb, or fingers.

Can you imagine how many picks you would go through in your lifetime ?

 

I could never use a thin pick. Tried it and just does not work for me. I hit strings pretty hard and don’t have much finesse in my playing style. I’m working on it though.

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I generally like a medium pick with a bit of flexibility for strumming... Too thin is useless, I hate the flappy sound when strumming and cant play lead with those...

 

Recently someone bought me some wooden picks.. they are pretty cool but way too thick for me. Still a nice gift to receive though.

 

EOi8XN1.jpg

 

6gge1aZ.jpg

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I began on thins as a teen and got used to them. I still use them from 0.65 to 0.70's. But after reading so many others using mediums to Heavy the last time this was discussed awhile back, I tried several other thickness's. Heavy I just can't get used to. I have gotten use to playing with 0.73's and to me they feel like mediums more then lights and I did go up to 1.0mm Dunlops. Mainly because I wanted to try a pick that had the thumb grip on it, (that indentation circle in the middle) I have to admit it was easier to hold, no more dropping the picks or them sliding in my fingers, and that pick slap you refer to went away. So I really do like them. So like Sparky, I do use use thin to heavy now I guess. I do have a guitar pick punch the wife gave me but those I punch go to the 3 year old Grandson who looses them all over the house.msp_flapper.gif

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Ever since I read an interview with Brian May in the late '70s where he stated he used an old (Victorian-era) silver 6d I've used one of these similarly old silver 3d coins. The 6d is larger and I prefer the tiny size - just 1/2" (15mm) in diameter - of the 3d. It gives a wonderful 'ching' sound to the note when used gently and, being solid, is perfect for digging in without choking the note.

 

The year actually matters quite a bit because after 1920 the silver content was reduced from over 90% to 50%. The edge of the softer, earlier coins will 'round' quite quickly in use whereas the later coins do NOT wear and keep a hard 90-degree edge which, whilst desirable in a coin, is not as useful for a pick.

 

This picture shows it at approx 2x life size.

 

Silver_thruppeny-bit.jpg

 

Pip.

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